Name of Department:                   Department of Sociology
Name of Ag.Head Of Deparment:          Dr. P. O. Abu
Contact E-mail:                               owapiriba.jackreece@uniport.edu.ng
Contact Phone Number(s):               08037315349

HISTORY OF THE DEPARTMENT

When the School of Social Sciences was established in 1975, the Sociology sub-unit was one of  five such sub-units that made up the School. The others were Economics, Geography, Political and Administrative Studies and Business Administration (which) later transformed to the Faculty of Management Sciences). It operated as an integral part of a Social Science programme which was then aimed at training out manpower for the social and economic development of Nigeria and to train the students for positions of responsibility in the community. The Dean of the Faculty had overall administrative responsibility over all the units. However, the Department was academically autonomous but administratively tied to the Office of the Dean.

 

In 1983, the UNIPORT school system was changed to the faculty system which granted both academic and administrative autonomy to the department. Since then, the department has had its ups and downs as dictated by events over the years. However, through a dynamic inter-play of experience from a variety of scholars and accreditation demands, a stable Sociology programme with a mixture of radical and conservative intellectual traditions eventually emerged at both undergraduate and post-graduate levels.

 

The entire course prescribed by the National Universities Commission (NUC) in its approved minimum academic standards is offered by the Department. In addition however, the Department maintains its academic autonomy by including in its curriculum special courses designed to achieve the specific vision and objectives of the department.

 

Vision

The vision of the Department of Sociology, University of Port Harcourt, is the emergence of a viable Nigerian nation sustained on the intellectual and research contributions of Sociologists, in collaboration with other academic disciplines and in partnership with formal/informal organizations working towards achieving sustainable development.

 

Mission

Tremendous changes are taking place all over the world and Nigeria’s socio-economic, political, religious and cultural environments are responding to the new global challenges. The Department of Sociology, University of Port Harcourt, must be in the fore front of efforts to understand these changes; provide adequate research knowledge to respond pro-actively towards ensuring adequate control of the new social forces and enhance the capacity of its staff to train the manpower required for the envisaged challenges.

Objectives

  1. To inculcate in the students a scientific spirit of inquiry and objectivity.
  2.  To stimulate students’ interest in the discipline and all other branches of the Social Sciences.
  3. To stimulate the spirit of dedication to service to our society and humanity in general, among students.
  4. To prepare students for leadership positions in the social, economic and political institution both inside and outside our country.
  5. To prepare students for self-employment and to carry out researches for the further development of the discipline, the community and humanity in general.

For 42 years of existence of the Department of Sociology, University of Port Harcourt, it has benefitted from the experiences of the following Heads of Departments.

S/NO NAME TENURE
1. Dr. Alfred Ukaegbu 1977-1980
2. Prof. Mark O.C. Anikpo 1980-1982; 1983-1985

1989-1991; 2001-2002

3. Prof. Ikenna Nzimiro 1982-1983
4. Prof. Stephen Ekpenyong 1985-1987; 1991-1995; 2005-2006
5. Prof. Inya Eteng 1987-1989
6. Prof. Josiah D. Atemie 1995-1997; 1999-2001
7. Prof. Darlington Iwarimie-Jaja 1977-1998
8. Prof. Martin Ifeanacho 2002-2004
9. Prof. Benjamin Okaba 2006-2007
10. Prof. Kinikanwo A. Anele 2007-2008; 2010-2012
11. Prof. Stephen Okodudu 2008-2010
12. Prof. Paul Eke 2012-2014
13. Prof. Chukwunenye I. Okereke 2014-2016
14 Dr.Owapiriba Prayer Abu 2016-2018

Academic Staff Composition

S/NO NAME QUALIFICATION AREA OF SPECIALIZATION DESIGNATION
1 Iwarimie-Jaja, D. B.Sc.,  M.A. Ph.D Criminology Professor
2 Ifeanacho, M. B.A.  M.A ,  Ph.D Human Resource Management Professor
3 Okodudu, S.A. B.Sc,  M.Sc, Ph.D. Development Studies Professor
4 Eke, Paul Onyema B.Sc,  M.Sc, Ph.D. Peace & Conflict Studies Professor
5 Anele, K.A. B.Sc,  M.Sc, Ph.D. Social Dynamics Professor
6 Okereke, C.I. B.Sc,  M.Sc,MBA, Ph.D. Population Studies Professor
7 Ekpenyong, O.A. BA, M.Sc, PhD Rural Sociology/Development Senior Lecturer
8 Abu,  O.P. B.Sc,  M.Sc, Ph.D. Medical Sociology & Gerontology Senior Lecturer
9 Joseph-Obi   Chioma B.ED, MPP, MA, Ph.D Social Psychology Senior Lecturer
10 Sofiri-Joab Peterside B.Sc,  M.Sc, Ph.D. Development Studies Senior Lecturer
11 Onyige, Chioma Daisy B.A,  M.Sc, Ph.D. Criminology Senior Lecturer
12 Nsirim-Worlu, H.G. B.A,  M.Sc, Ph.D. Development Studies Senior Lecturer
13 Okemini, E.B. B.A,  M.Sc, Ph.D. Human Resource Mgt. Senior Lecturer
14 Wordu, Steve Afoma B.A,  M.Sc, Ph.D. Environmental Sociology Senior Lecturer
15 Badey, Dinebari K. B.Sc, M.Sc, Ph.D. Development Studies Senior Lecturer
16 Wosu, Eze B.Sc, M.Sc, Ph.D. Development Studies Senior Lecturer
17 Uranta, D.A. B.Ed, M.Sc, Ph.D. Social Work & Comm. Dev. Senior Lecturer
  Erondu, C.I. B.Sc , M.Sc, Ph.D Development Studies Senior Lecturer
18 Ndene, Godwin A. B.Sc,  MBA, M.Sc & Ph.D Industrial Relations & HRM Lecturer I
20 Oriji, Christian B.ED, M.Sc,  Ph.D Medical Sociology Lecturer I
21 Ogbanga Mina M. BSc. M.Sc, Ph.D Social Work & Comm. Dev Lecturer I
22 Nwauzor, Adaku A. B.Sc, M.Sc, Ph.D Urban Sociology Lecturer I
23 Samuel  Paul Kinikanwo B.Sc, M.Sc Industrial Relations & HRM Lecturer I
24 Agwanwo, Destiny B.Sc,  M.Sc., Criminology Lecturer II
*25 Oladejo, Abiodun O. B.Sc., M.Sc Industrial Relations & HRM Lecturer II
26 Nwakanma, Emmanuel B.Sc. Development Studies Lecturer 1I

*Lecturer on study leave.

NON- TEACHING STAFF

S/N               NAMES                                      QUALIFICATION                           DESIGNATION
1                Lily Cookey (Miss)                                B.A                                         Admin. Assistant
2                Nwachukwu, Philomina                    WAEC/NABTEB                        Chief Sec. Asst. I
3                   Samuel Chukwu                                    BSC                                    Chief Clerical Officer
4                 Inumgba Brother Kagbara                    NABTEB                                  Chief Sec. Asst.
5                 Abel, Margaret C.                                   NECO                                    Computer Operator I
6                Amadi, Peace W                                        FSLC                                    Messenger/Cleaner

 

Admission/Matriculation Requirements/General

University Requirement

The basic admission requirements of the University are:

  1. Five credits in the Senior Secondary Certificate or equivalent, including English and Mathematics obtained in not more than two sittings.
  2. A score in JAMB not below the cut-off point for the particular department in the year in question.

 

Specific Departmental Requirement:

To be admitted into the Sociology B.Sc Programme, a candidate must have five (5) credit level passes in English, Mathematics, and any three of Government or History, Geography, Economics or Commerce and Religious Knowledge.

 

General University Guidelines/Policies

Every student is advised in his or her own interest to read and understand the following guidelines.

 

The Course System

The course system has a number of implications as enumerated below:

  1. A course is made up of separate lectures and seminars over the specified time period.
  2. Courses required for graduation must be registered and passed
  3. The student may not necessarily graduate after 4 years
  4. Courses failed are usually carried over into the next semester or academic year as the case may be.
  5. A student must obtain a stipulated CGPA (Cumulative Grade Point Average) to qualify for graduation.

For the purpose of teaching and examination, the academic year is divided into two semesters, each of approximately sixteen weeks.

 

Instruction is by courses. The unit for a course is the credit unit. One credit unit being when class meets for one hour every week for one semester in a lecture or tutorial. Three credit units means when class meets for three hours every week.

 

The normal course/load for a full-time student is 15-24 credit units per semester. No student is permitted to register for less than 15 or more than 24 credit units in any semester. These are prescribed. Part time students must register for not less than 12 and not more than 16 credit units in any term.

 

There are prerequisite and concurrent requirements for courses, but these may be waived at the discretion of the faculty upon recommendation by the department offering the course.

 

Every course shall be continuously assessed and examined at the end of the semester in which it is given. Re-sit examinations have no place in the course credit system and is not permitted.

 

Students must not exceed the maximum number of 24 credit units for one semester when they are re-registering failed courses. Any course which would cause the maximum to be exceeded must be deferred to the following year.

 

Grade points earned at all attempts in a particular course counts towards the CGPA. Students are not allowed to repeat a course which they have passed.

 

Academic Advisers

Every student is attached to an Academic Adviser, who is a member of the Academic staff and who will advise him/her on academic affairs as well as on personal matters. Academic Advisers are to provide counseling to them.

 

It is the duty of the Head of Department to assign Academic Adviser to each student. Academic Advisers should give clear information on the notice boards about their visiting times in their offices at which they will be available to students who wish to consult them.

 

University Registration of Fresh student: The initial stages of registration for incoming first year students are normally conducted by the Examination and Records Unit of the Registry Department. Registration goes through stages here and directives are normally circulated to specify what is to be done at each stage. However, since the 1993/94 academic year, registration has been carried out by the respective faculties; and most recently in the open by a combined team of the Academic Office, MIS Unit and respective Faculties.

 

Registration of Course

The period for normal registration is the first three weeks of each academic year, excluding the orientation week or as adjusted by the appropriate authority of the University.

Course registration is the responsibility of the student’s parent department. The Head of Department or his representative signs for all the courses registered.

 

The student should re-register all previously failed courses in which the programme requires a pass, and meet the prescribed requirements for each course registered. Furthermore, the total credit units registered should not be less than 15 or more than 24 per semester in the case of regular students, and not less than 12 and not more than 16 per term in the case of part time students.

 

 

 

ANY REGISTRATION  COMPLETED AFTER THE TIME SPECIFIED WILL BE NULL AND VOID AND WILL NOT BE CREDITED TO THE STUDENT EVEN WHEN HE/SHE HAS TAKEN AND PASSED EXAMINATION IN A COURSE FOR WHICH THEY HAD NOT PREVIOUSLY REGISTERED. SUCH ACTIONS ARE FRAUDULENT AND CULPRITS WILL BE APPROPRIATELY DISCIPLINED 

Students must ensure that they pay their school charges before the portal closes.They are expected to register their courses online, print out their online registration form and submit copies of the form to the Department and faculty. Note that the processes must be completed six weeks upon resumption.

The registration portal will be shot one month to the first semester examination. Failure to pay school charges and registration of courses in a session will attract loss of studentship for that session. Note that the lost session will form part of the total duration allowed for the programme.

A list of students registered for each course will be kept. The list will be displayed for one week immediately after the close of registration for necessary corrections.

 

The parent faculty and the parent department will retain one copy each of this list and forward copies to the teaching faculty to be distributed as follows: one to the Faculty, one to the Department and one to the Course Lecturer. This list becomes the official register for the course examination.

 

For first-year students, the following forms are returned to the Academic Officer:

 

Bio-data (MIS form), completed Course registration (MIS Form 2) and the fees (MMIS Form 4). Students are encouraged to join their professional associations and to pay the fee for such association. However, this will not be tied to the registration process.

 

Application for adding or dropping a course must be made on the prescribed Add/Drop Form and Certified by the Registrar after obtaining the approval of the Head of Department concerned, not later than four weeks before the examination in each semester. Any change of course made by altering the registration form will be null and void.

 

Auditing of Course

Students may attend a course outside their prescribed programme. The course shall be recorded in their transcript only if they have registered for it with the approval of the Head of Department and Dean of the Faculty and taken the prescribed examination. Audited courses shall not be used in calculating the CGPA.

 

Change of Degree Programme:

A student who had been admitted to a degree programme on satisfying the minimum requirements for entry into the University shall not normally be allowed to change until he/she had completed the first academic year in the programme.

 

A student awarded a scholarship in a discipline different from that for whichhe/she is admitted can be allowed to change Faculty or Department to that in which the programme specified by the scholarship. Award is available, provided that he/she meets the requirements of the faculty or department to which a change is desired.

 

Application to change Faculty shall normally be made by the student concerned on a prescribed form which can be obtained from the Admissions Office through the Head of the present Department and Faculty, who recommends to the Faculty Board. The form must be submitted in triplicate. Duly completed copies of the change of programme form shall be forwarded to the Committee of Deans for approval and to the Registrar for certification. Thereafter, the Registrar shall retain a copy and forward a copy each to the two Heads, the respective Deans and the students concerned. Intra-faculty transfer should be done by the Faculty Board and the Committee of Deans informed.

 

To qualify for consideration to transfer to the professional programmes in Medicine, Engineering and Management Sciences, a student shall be required to obtain a CGPAof 4 points or above at the time of application.

 

Inter-University Transfer

A student from another University may seek a transfer to any of the programmes in the Faculty of Social Sciences provided that his/her CGPA is not less than 3.0 Such applicants must apply in the appropriate form enclosing relevant credentials and transcript of academic record to the Registrar. All applicants for inter-University transfer shall be of good standing in their various universities.

 

Deferment of Admission

A candidate who is offered admission and is qualified at the time, but is unable to take up the offer at the required time may have the admission deferred. Note that the only way the University can certify that the candidate is qualified is for the candidate to go through the registration exercise before applying for deferment. In all cases, requests for deferment must be made in writing stating the reason and forwarded through the Head of Department of the

approved course programme for which admission was offered to the Dean who shall then present it to the Faculty Board for approval.

 

Although limited in number, there are student hostels located in the three main campuses in the University (Choba, Delta and Abuja) Parks. There is also accommodation for graduate students.

Allocation of spaces in the halls of residence is the direct responsibility of the Student Affairs’ Department, which is located at Choba Campus. Hostel allocation is based on the Student Affairs’ own guidelines. Normally, first and final year students are accommodated in these hostels, while students in other years of study may be accommodated based on availability of bed spaces. In any case, persons with physical challengesand students who engage in sports and represent the University in sporting outings may be considered first before students in other years of study.

 

As a rule, squatting is prohibited and an allottee may lose his/her bed space if found guilty of squatting any student. Off-campus accommodation is available within the vicinity of the University. This can be got through private arrangement between the student and landlord.

 

Attendance to lectures is mandatory. A minimum of 75% attendance is required and every course shall be continuously assessed and examined at the end of the semester in which it is given.

 

Timetable

A timetable for lectures is provided by the University Timetable Committee and is adhered to for minimal clashes. However, students are requested to report any clashed lecture to their Head of Department.

 

Continuation, Probation and Withdrawal

Continuation Requirement: The continuation requirement in the University is a CGPA of 1.50 at the end of every academic year.

 

  • : Probation is a status granted to a student whose academic performance falls below an acceptable standard. A student whose Cumulative Grade Point is below 1.50 at the end of a particular year of study earns a period of probation for one academic session.

However, students on probation may not register for more than 18 units per semester. The purpose of the restriction is to give the students chance to concentrate on improving their performance and thus raising their CGPA.

 

Warning of Danger of Probation: Students should be warned by their Department if at the end of any semester their CGPA falls below 1.50.

Repeating Failed Course Unit(s): Subject to the conditions for withdrawal and probation, a student must repeat any failed courses at the next available opportunity, provided the total number of credit units carried during that semester does not exceed 24 (for Regular students and 16 for Part – Time students), and the Grade Points earned at all attempts shall count towards the CGPA.

 

Temporary Withdrawal from Study: A student may apply for temporary withdrawal from study for a period of one year, which may be renewed up to a maximum of two (2) years.

 

  • : A student whose Cumulative Grade Point Average is below 1.50 at the end of one year’s probation shall be required to withdraw from the programme.

 

Duration of Degree Programmes: A student who after the maximum length of time allowed for a degree programme, has not obtained a degree, shall be asked to withdraw from the programme. The maximum length of time that a student shall be permitted to spend on a standard 4 –year programme shall be Six (6) years. This regulation does not apply to the MBBS programme, which has its own requirements. For Part –Time programme, the maximum is seven (7) years. However, it will revert to six from the 2018/19.

 

 

General Requirement for a Degree (B.Sc)

To obtain a degree in University of Port Harcourt, a student must complete the approved programme of study in his/her department. Every student is urged to familiarize himself/herself with the specific requirements for a Bachelor’s degree in his/her department.

 

Year IGeneral Studies Courses

Foundation Courses

Major Courses

 

Year IIFoundation Courses

Major Courses

 

Year IIIMajor Courses

Elective

Industrial Training (where applicable)

 

Year IVMajor Courses

Seminar Courses

Project

 

Examination Regulations

By Section 6(2) (b) of the University of Port Harcourt Decree (1979) (vi) it shall, in particular, be the function of the Senate to make provision for “the organization and control of courses of study at the University and of the examination held in conjunction with those courses, including the appointment of examiners, both internal and external” (where necessary).

 

Section 6 (5) Stipulates:“Regulations shall provide, that at least one of the persons appointed as the examiners at each final or professional examination held in conjunction with any course of study at the University is not a teacher at the University but is a teacher of the branch of learning to which the course relates at some other University of high repute”.

 

Pursuant to the foregoing Sections 6 (2) (b) and 6 (5), Senate hereby provides the following examination regulations:-

 

Course Examinations

  1. Every course of instruction shall be continuously assessed and examined at the end of the semester in which it is given.

 

  1. A range of 30% to 60% should be adopted for continuous assessment weighting by the University in view of the work input expected from students in the various programmes of study.

 

  1. Subject only to administrative supervision by the Dean’s Office the conduct of course examinations shall be the responsibility of the Head of Department.

 

Note that presently in the Department, continuous assessment is 30% and end of semester examination is 70% for all under-graduateand Post-Graduateprogrammes.

 

Conduct of Examination

It is normal that one week is provided for revision before examination starts. A University-wide Time Table is provided for examination for each registered course Examinations are scheduled for the last weeks of the semester, with the first week of examination reserved for the University-wide and faculty-wide large class courses.

 

If no satisfactory reasons are provided for failure to sit an examination, a grade of F is recorded for the student in the affected courses.

 

ABSENCE FROM EXAMINATION DUE TO ILL HEALTH SHOULD BE SUPPORTED WITH A MEDICAL CERTIFICATE AND REPORTED TO THE DEPARTMENT, WHICH SHALL FORWARD SUCH CERTIFICATE TO THE DIRECTOR OF MEDICAL SERVICES FOR AUTHENTIFICATION.

 

It is normal that one week is provided for revision before examination starts.  A University-wide Time Table is provided for examination for each registered course.  Examinations are scheduled for the last weeks of the semester, with the first week of examination reserved for the University-wide and Faculty-wide large class courses.

 

If no satisfactory reasons are provided for failure to sit an examination, a grade of F is scored in the affected course.

 

Examination Malpractice

The penalty for any form of examination malpractice is EXPULSION. It may even lead to refusal of admission into other Nigerian Universities. Any student found guilty of forging certificates, transcripts and other admission documents shall be expelled from the University (see appendix 1).

 

Scoring and Grading Systems and Classification of Degree

The following table provided in the NUC approved minimum standard in Social Sciences for all Nigerian Universities is applicable.

 

(i)

Credit Units

(ii)

Scores

(iii)

Letter

Grade

(iv)

GP

(v) GPA (iv) CGPA (vii) Class of Degree
Vary according to contact hour

assigned to each

week per semester and according to work load carried by the student.

70-100

60-69

50-59

45-49

40-44

0-39

A

B

C

D

E

F

5

4

3

2

1

0

Derived by

multiplying (i)by (iv)

4.50-5.00

3.50-4.49

2.40-3.49

1.50-1.40

1.00-1.49

0.0.99

1st Class

2nd Class Upper

2nd Class Lower

3rd Class

Pass

Fail

 

7.00     Computation of Grade Point Average:

7.01     Every course carries a fixed number of Credit Units (Cu); one credit Unit being when a class meets for one hour every week for one semester, or three credit units when classes meet for three hours every week in the laboratory workshop or field.

 

7.02     Quality Points (QP) are derived by multiplying the Credit Units for the course by the Grade Points earned by the student. E.g in a course with 3 Credit Units in which a student earned a B with 4 Grade Points, the Quality points are 3×4 – 12

 

 

7.03     Grade Point Average (GPA) by dividing the Quality Points for the semester by the Credit Units for the semester e.g in a semester where the student earned 56 Quality points for 18 Credit Units the GPA is 56÷ 18 = 3.11

 

7.04     Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) is derived by adding the total quality points (TQP) to date and dividing by the Total Credit Units (TCU) to date: e.g, if the TQP are 228 and the CU are 68, then the CGPA is 228÷68 = 3.35.

 

7.05    Detailed example of how to calculate GPA and CGPA

FIRST YEAR, FIRST SEMESTER

Course Credit Units Letter Grade Grade Points Quality Points Grade Point

Average (GPA)

Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA)
APC

APC

APC

APC

APC

APC

TOTAL

3

2

1

4

5

2

17

B

C

C

B

A

D

4

3

3

4

5

2

12

6

3

16

25

4

66

QP=66

CU

=17GPA

 

=66+17

TQP=66

TCU=17

CGPA

=66+17=3.88

 

 

FIRST YEAR, SECOND SEMESTER

COURSE Credit Units Letter Grade Grade Points Quality

Points

Grade Point Average (GPA) Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA)
APC 106

APC 107

APC 108

APC 109

APC 110

TOTAL

5

4

5

3

3

     20

E

D

B

F

A

1

2

4

0

5

5

8

20

0

15

48

QP = 61

CU = 18

GPA =

61+18

=.08

TQP = 175

TCU = 55

CGPA =

175+55=3.18

 

SECOND YEAR, FIRST SEMESTER

COURSE Credit Units Letter Grade Grade Points Quality Points Grade Point Average (GPA) Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA)
APC 210

APC 211

APC 121

APC 213

APC 214

TOTAL

2

3

5

5

3

18

E

C

B

C

A

1

3

4

3

5

2

9

20

15

15

61

QP = 61

CU = 18

GPA =

61 + 18

= .08

 

TQP = 175

TCU = 55

CGPA =

175+55=3.18

 

 

 

SECOND YEAR, SECOND SEMESTER

COURSE Credit Units Letter Grade Grade Points Quality

Points

Grade Point Average (GPA) Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA)
APC 215

APC 216

APC 217

APC 218

APC 219

APC 109

TOTAL

3

4

5

2

3

3

    20

B

C

B

E

C

D

4

3

4

0

3

2

12

128

20

0

9

6

59

QP = 59

CU = 20

GPA =

59 + 20

= 2.9.5

 

TQP = 234

TCU = 75

CGPA =

234+57=3.12

 

Observe how the course APC 109 was failed in year 1, Semester 2 and computed with F = 0 in year 1. It was then re-registered and computed with D = 2 in year 11, Semester 2. The old grade is now replaced by the new one.

 

THIRD YEAR, FIRST SEMESTER

COURSE Credit Units Letter Grade Grade Points Quality Points Grade Point Average (GPA) Cumulative Grade
APC 300

3

B

4

12

QP=51 TQP = 285
APC 301

3

C

3

9

CU=17 TCU = 92
APC 302

3

B

0

0

GPA = 51+

17   = 3.00

CGPA

= 285-92=3.10

APC 303

4

E

4

16

   
APC 304

3

C

5

10

   
APC 305

 

TOTAL

3

17

D

2

4

51

   

 

 

 

THIRD YEAR, SECOND SEMESTER

COURSE Credit Units Letter Grade Grade Points Quality Points Grade Point Average (GPA) Cumulative Grade
APC 310

APC 311

APC 312

APC 313

APC 314

APC 315

APC 218

 

TOTAL

3

3

3

4

3

3

2

21

D

C

E

B

A

E

C

2

3

1

4

5

0

3

6

9

3

16

15

0

6

55

QP = 55

CU = 21

GPA =

55 + 17

= 2.62

TQP = 340

TCU = 92

CGPA =

340 + 113

= 3.01

 

FOURTH YEAR, FIRST SEMESTER

COURSE Credit Units Letter Grade Grade Points Quality Points Grade Point Average (GPA) Cumulative Grade
APC 400

APC 401

APC 402

APC 403

APC 404

APC 405

APC 302

TOTAL

3

3

3

4

2

2

3

20

A

C

B

C

E

D

C

5

3

4

3

1

2

3

15

9

12

12

2

4

9

63

QP = 63

CU = 20

GPA =

63 + 20

= 3.15

 

TQP = 403

TCU = 133

CGPA =

403 + 133

= 3.03

 

FOURTH YEAR, SECOND SEMESTER

COURSE Credit Units Letter Grade Grade Points Quality Points Grade Point  Average (GPA) Cumulative Grade Point  Average (CGPA)
APC 410

3

B

4

12

QP = 88

CU = 25

GPA = 88 ÷ 20

= 3.25

TQP = 491

TCU = 158

CGPA = 491 ÷ 158

= 3.12

2ND Class Lower

APC 411

3

D

2

6

APC 412

3

C

3

9

APC 413

4

B

4

16

APC 414

3

A

5

15

APC 415

6

B

4

24

APC0 315

3

D

2

6

TOTAL

25

88

 

7.06     Grades obtained in all approved courses of a student’s prescribed programme, excluding audited courses, shall be used to compute the GPA.

 

7.07     Where a student was registered for a course but the result is unavailable due to no fault of the student, no result will be recorded for that course and the student will re-register for it in the next academic year. This second registration will be treated as first attempt, provided the student formally notified his/her Department.

 

7.08     Where a student transfers from one Faculty to another, only the grades obtained in the courses in the new prescribed programme of study will be used to compute the CGAP.

Courses which were completed before the change of programme and which are not part of the new prescribed programme will be treated as audited courses.

 

7.09     Procedure for the Review of Scripts of Aggrieved Students

Students shall be entitled to see their marked examination scripts if they so desire provided appropriate steps are taken to safeguard scripts.

 

Any student who is aggrieved about the grading of a course examination may petition his/her Head of Department in the first instance through the Academic Officer. The Head of Department shall refer the petition to the Dean of the Faculty, who shall cause the scripts to be re-assessed and the scores presented to the Faculty Board for determination.

 

A student applying for a review of answer scripts shall be required to pay the following fees to the Bursary before commencement of the review: Course Examination N500.00 per course. If the petition is upheld, the fee so paid shall be refunded to the student within 30 days from the release of the result.

 

 

8.00     AVAILABLE SOCIOLOGY PROGRAMMES

 

8.01     A.  UNDERGRADUATE

 

The current undergraduate regular and part-time programmes have undergone several revisions. In their current forms, courses with practical applications have been increased in response to the growing need for self employment in a country where graduate unemployment has become the norm.

 

BSC (SOCIOLOGY) COURSES AND CREDIT UNITS

(FULL-TIME PROGRAMME)

         100 LEVEL, FIRST SEMESTER

 

Course Code

Course Title

Credit Units

GES101.1 Introduction to Computer

2

GES 103.1 Nigerian Peoples and Culture

2

GES 104.1 History and Philosophy of Science

2

Compulsory

SOC 102.1 Introduction to Sociology

3

Required

SOC 101.1 Elements of Scientific Thought

3

SOC 104.1 Introduction to Psychology

2

ECO 102.1 Principles of Economics

3

  (Any course outside the Faculty)

3

                           Total Credit Units

20

 

SECOND SEMESTER

Course Code

Course Title

Credit Units

GES 100.2 Communication Skills in English

3

GES 102.2 Introduction to Logic and Philosophy

2

Compulsory

SOC 105.2 Introduction to Anthropology

2

SOC 108.2 Nigerian Heritage

2

SOC 109.2 Introduction to African Societies & Culture

3

Two Non-Departmental Courses

POL 101.2 Political Analysis

3

GEM 106.2 Man and His Environment

2

                           Total Credit Units

18

 

 

200-LEVEL SOCIOLOGY

 

YEAR TWO, FIRST SEMESTER

Course Code

Course Title

Credit Units

GES 101.1 Introduction to Computer

2

FSC 201.1 Community Service

1

Compulsory

SOC 221.1 History of Social Thought

3

SOC 224.1 Language in Society & Culture

3

Elective (Any Two of the Following)

SOC 223.1 The Military and the State

3

SOC 225.1 Sociology of the Family

3

SOC 226.1 Sociology of Knowledge, Science& Technology

3

SOC 227.1 Sociology of Education

3

  And any Non-Departmental Elective Course

3

                           Total Credit Units

18

 

SECOND SEMESTER

Course Code

Course Title

Credit Units

SOC 237.2 Youths and the Development of Africa

2

Compulsory

SOC 242.2 Social Statistics

3

SOC 238.2 Social Change & Social Problems

3

SOC 232.2 Social Psychology

2

Required

SOC 239.2 Structure of the Nigerian Society

2

MATH 182.2 Application of the Computer

3

Electives (Any one of the Following)

SOC 235.2 Sociology of Mass Communication

3

SOC 234.2 Food and Famine in Africa

3

SOC 236.2 Women in Society

3

                           Total Credit Units

18

 

300-LEVEL SOCIOLOGY

YEAR THREE, FIRST SEMESTER

Course Code

Course Title

Credit Units

Compulsory

SOC 331.1 Methods of Social Research

3

SOC 333.1 Social Inequality, Stratification & Mobidity

3

SOC 332.1 Contemporary Sociology Theories

3

Required

SOC 335.1 Inter-group Relations

3

Electives (Any two of the following)

SOC 351.1 Peasant Societies

3

SOC 337.1 Sociology of Law

3

SOC 338.1 Sociology of Urban Life

3

SOC 339.1 Sociology of Religion

SOC 340.1 Sociology of Health and Illness Behaviour

3

                           Total Credit Units

18

 

SECOND SEMESTER

Course Code

Course Title

Credit Units

GES 300.2 Entrepreneurship Development

2

Compulsory

SOC 353.2 Political Sociology

3

SOC 350.2 Sociology of Crime & Delinquency

3

Required

SOC 343.2 Rural Sociology

3

SOC 344.2 Formal Organization

3

Electives  (Any Two of the Following)

SOC 346.2 Class Analysis

2

SOC 348.2 Sociology of the Aged

2

SOC 349.2 Sociology of Non-Violent Change

2

                           Total Credit Units

18

 

 

 

400-LEVEL SOCIOLOGY

YEAR FOUR, FIRST SEMESTER

Course Code

Course Title

Credit Units

Compulsory

SOC 442.1 Demography

3

SOC 443.1 Sociology of the Third World

3

SOC 445.1 Urbanization & Labour Migration

3

Required

SOC 444.1 Sociology of Development

3

SOC 441.1 Industrial Sociology

3

Electives (Any one of the following)

SOC 446.1 Sociology of Medicine

3

SOC 447.1 Child Development

3

SOC 448.1 Personality and Motivation

3

SOC 449.1 Models in Sociological Analysis

3

                           Total Credit Units

18

 

SECOND SEMESTER

Course Code

Course Title

Credit Units

GES 400.2 Entrepreneurship Project

2

Compulsory

SOC  400.2 Regional Ethnography

3

SOC 404.2 Individual Research Project

6

Required

SOC 401.2 Sociology of Sub-Saharan Africa

3

Electives ( Any Two of the Following)

SOC 405.2 Applied Demography

2

SOC 406.2 Culture and Communication

2

SOC 407.2 Sociology of De-colonization

2

SOC 409.2 Sociology of Deviant Behaviour

2

SOC 410.2 Poverty and Africa Development

2

SOC 411.2 Environmental Sociology

2

SOC 412.2 Terrorism and Social Development

2

                           Total Credit Units

18

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

SOC 101.1      Elements of Scientific Thought & Social Research

This course will review the theoretical and methodological foundation of Social Science. It will examine issues such as the nature of science and problems of scientific explanations, methodological problems of Social Science, concept formation, theories and paradigms the existential determination of knowledge, etc. Students will be introduced to the nature of statistics, statistical inquiries, forms of design, etc. the role of statistics and basic concepts in statistics will be equally examined.

 

SOC 102.1      Introduction to Sociology

The study of the social system and its relationship to other systems particularly the political and economic systems will be emphasized, it will attempt to understand how social systems evolve, differentiate, cohere or disintegrate. Introduction to basic concepts of sociological analysis, such as roles, social structure, function, conflict, class consensus, power, value, authority and culture.

 

SOC 104.1      Introduction to Psychology

Introduction to the relationship between the functioning of social systems and the behaviours and attitude of individuals.

 

SOC 105.2      Introduction to Anthropology

This course introduces the students to the concepts, themes, perspectives and method of anthropological inquiries. Other areas include the evolution to humanity, human biological and ecological variations, economic anthropology, cultural ethnology, anthropology of development and hibernation anthropology.

 

SOC 226.1- Sociology of Knowledge and Technology

Social determination of knowledge. Examination of science and technology as social and cultural institutions. Similarities and differences between scientific modes of thinking and those governing other human activities.  Technology and development process; knowledge systems which govern cumulative technology; science and technology and cultural convergence.

 

SOC 227.1      Sociology of Education

Education as a social institution and a social purpose. The role of education in social stability and change.  A comparison between various educational systems.  Education and African social and cultural development.  The politics of education.

 

SOC 221.1      History of Social Thought

An introduction to the main contributors to social thought and the rise and development of modern sociology, including background (North-western and Islamic) modern classical sociologists, and contemporary African theories about society.

 

SOC 109.2 -Introduction to African Societies and Cultures

                        (African Traditional Social Institutions)

Introduction to and survey of human origins and cultural achievements, social anthropology, historical and methodological perspectives.

 

SOC 224.1      – Language in Society & Culture

An examination of the social and cultural functions of language with particular reference to Nigeria and other West African societies; language and societal development, language problems of new states, and language policy are emphasized.

 

SOC 225.1      Sociology of the Family

Analysis of the principles of kinship classification and the types and functions of groups formed on these principles, Study of marriage as a social institution.

 

SOC 232.2      Social Psychology

Brief historical outline of the science of social psychology; its distinctive field of study and its interrelationship with other social sciences and Introductory survey of social psychological concepts such as social learning, internalization, conscience-formation, values and attitudes, prejudice and discrimination stereotypes. The influence of group process, organizational variables and cultures upon the social modification of basic drives, attitudes, social systems and group structures; an analysis of the socio-psychological fabric, which knits African societies together.

 

 

SOC 234.2      Food and Famine in Africa

An examination of the sociological, political, economic and environmental factors that affect the production of food in Africa. Also to be examined are the theoretical underpinning of African food crisis and the role played by the international community.

 

SOC 235.2      Sociology of Mass Communication

The course provides some basic foundation for the study of human communication. It is designed to aid students better to understand the nature, functions and concepts of the mass media and their institutions. The theoretical, conceptual and evaluative aspects of communication will be examined. Also to be considered are the implications of the growth of Mass Media Institutions, the way in which they shape views, modify behaviour and help to fashion society now and in future.

 

SOC 236.2      Women in Society

An introduction to women studies; a survey of traditional and contemporary attitudes of male-centred societies to women and factors which shape these attitudes; public policy issues on women is equally important here.

 

SOC 237.2      Youths and Development in Africa

This course examines the roles of youths as dependable ingredients for social development.  The roles of youths in technological innovation and creativity will be examined.

 

SOC 238.2      Social Change and Social Problems

Theoretical perspectives, institutional analysis of the phenomenon of social change, concept of social problems, and social problems resulting from social change are focused.

 

SOC 239.2      – Structure of the Nigerian Society

The structure of the Nigerian Society in terms of core analytical sociological and anthropological concepts. Analysis of the patterns of socio-economic elements of continuity and social change impact of globalization on the entire social structure. Emphasis on migration patterns and social mobility, social class and social inequalities, major social problems and social welfare, ethnicity, etc.

 

SOC 331.1      Methods of Social Research

Formulation of social issues as research questions; general concepts concerning scientific methods; strategies of descriptive research and historical research; tools of research, various types, methods and their advantages and disadvantages.

 

SOC 332.1      Contemporary Sociological Theories

Major theorists and schools of thought in the 20th Century Development of classical sociological theories; the major orientations in contemporary sociological theories functionalism, symbolic interactionism, conflict theory, ethnomethodology, exchange theory and other perspectives; application of these theories to contemporary problems.

 

SOC 335.1      Inter-Group Relations

The nature and dynamics of inter-group transactions; and examination of relations between peoples of different cultures, religion, ethnic groups, ideologies, etc., with special reference to plural Nigeria

 

SOC 441.1      Industrial Sociology

The structure and functions of industrial organizations. Analysis of major management theories. The process of industrialization in developing countries. Industry and society,

personnel and human resources issues. Industrial conflict, industrial workgroups and informal organizations. Relations between workers and management.

 

 

SOC 337.1      Sociology of Law

A sociological treatment of the social origins and consequences of law and its logical process; the traditional African local cultures and their contemporary relevance; the structure and functioning of legal sanctions; law and society, the law and the economy, law and cultural processes.

 

SOC 338.1      Sociology of Urban Life

Urban sociology as a field of study; and overview of world urbanization, demography and ecology of the city, its social organization and the psychology of its inhabitants, the exercise of political and economic power in the city, urban institution, the city’s social problems and urban planning for cities.

 

SOC 339.1      Sociology of Religion

The functions of religious institutions in societies. The relationship between religion and society in relatively stable, small communities, the approaches of social anthropology to African religions. The rise of new religions and reform movements. The place of religion in modern complex societies. Religious leaders and leadership. Religious groups in Nigerian society. Religion and social change.

 

SOC 340.1      Sociology of Health and Illness Behaviour

An introduction to concepts and social aspects of health, illness and cure in different African societies with particular emphasis on Nigerian cultures; interaction between folk and modern medicine; the deliveries of healthcare as a social problem; the social structure of traditional versus modern healthcare delivery system, and their respective impacts.

 

SOC 443.1.     – Sociology of the Third World

Decolonisation and the emergence of the Third World; the characteristics of Third World people and their cultural profiles; The North-South interactions and the conflicts.

 

SOC 242.2      Social Statistics

The course will deal with selected topics in elementary statistical theory, estimation and testing, statistical methods and survey research.

 

SOC 343.2      Rural Sociology

The fundamental features of rural societies, their economic systems and patterns of transformations; the identification, evaluation and utilization of natural and human resources, and social change in rural societies; rural social institutions and their adaptation to change.

 

SOC 344.2      Formal Organization

Structural properties of organization and their consequences; bureaucracies and complex (formal) organizations in various institutional settings and the Relationship among organizations in the country; major theoretical and methodological problems in studying complex organizations; problems of formal organizations in the new States.

 

SOC 108.2      Nigerian Heritage

This course deals mainly with pre-colonial “Nigeria”. It focuses on the social, economic, political, artistic and technological developments in “Nigerian” societies before the effective influence of Western culture. Among other things, the course seeks to lay bare the misrepresentation that Nigeria (and indeed Africa) was in the “dark” before “the discovery” by Europeans. It therefore aims at drawing attention to the significance of Nigerian heritage in the nation’s quest for self-reliant development.

 

SOC 346.2      Class Analysis

Study of the theory and methodology of class analysis, and their application particularly in Nigeria. Assessment of the analytic utility of class analysis to other methodologies of sociology. The study will also place emphasis on the Marxists approach of class analysis of society, social change and development and on the issues of state inequality, power struggle, conflicts, marginalization and exploitation.

 

SOC 333.1      Social  Inequality Stratification and Mobility

An examination of the theoretical models of Social Inequality and stratification systems. The course attempts a comparative analysis of the stratification process and social mobility in industrial and developing societies with special reference to Africa. It equally examines the different facets of social inequality and their origins and consequences.

 

SOC 351.1.     Peasant Societies

The course deals first, with identification of the units of peasant social organization, character of peasant societies – typical forms of production and exchange. Second, peasantry as a class, the prevailing attitudes towards peasant societies, and third, the shape of government policies.

 

SOC 348.2      Sociology of the Aged (Gerontology)

The social needs of the aged in transitional and modern societies; Comparative study of human maturity, aging and death, as they are perceived in different cultures. Western Versus African attitudes towards the aged and aging as a process.

 

SOC 349.2      Sociology of Non-Violent Change

An examination of peaceful relationships between groups, classes, races, nations and international blocs, ideologies and religions; theories of peace and conflict, the development of the nation of the just society and its significance for a conflict resolution.

Problems of responsiveness and accountability in complex organizations, the educational imperatives of peaceful change in plural societies; freedom of political choice in plural change; forms of resistance, non-violence versus collective political violence, riots coups and revolutions; their causes and processes seen as failure to accommodate strategies of non-violent change.

 

SOC 400.2      Regional Ethnography:

Advanced study of Sub-Saharan Africa as a major ethnological region; human origins and early man; physical anthropology and archaeology, race and racism; the cultural regions of Africa, language and population migration in history; peoples and cultures of Africa.

 

SOC 401.2      Sociology of Sub-Saharan Africa

The course examines the pre-colonial and post-colonial socio-structure of Sub-Saharan Africa; reviews the classical theories of social change and evaluates their relevance to African experience and makes a critical review of sociological treatments of development and under-development in Africa.

 

SOC 404.2      Individual Research Project

As a prerequisite for the Bachelor of Science Degree in Sociology, every final year student will carry out an original research under a supervisor, to demonstrate empirically his/her grasp of the principles and methodologies of Sociology.

 

SOC 405.2      Applied Demography

Application of demography theories to the problems of planning and development particularly in Third World Countries.

 

SOC 406.2      Culture & Communication

An examination of human communication from the perspective of linguistic anthropology, traits and social structure behaviour as essentially communicative phenomena.

 

SOC 407.2      Sociology of Decolonization

A study of the colonial political economy and its influence on contemporary Nigerian social structure; examination of the processes that led to independence in selected Third World Countries; the roles played by individuals and pressure groups in the decolonization process. Also to study the colonial roots of contemporary neo-colonialism and Third World underdevelopment.

 

SOC 408.2      Industrial Psychology

Psychological assumptions of economic behaviour; human needs and their satisfaction; individual, group and industrial conflict; cognition and the relevance of learning theory to industry; ideology and industrial behaviour.

 

SOC 409.2      Sociology of Deviant Behaviour

Using illustrations from research, the course distinguishes between deviance and crime and discuses the manifest as well as the latent functions of deviance. The student is further introduced to the major debates on the causes of deviance in society.

 

SOC 342.2  –   Sociology of Crime and Delinquency

Nature and extent of crime; theories of crime causation; traditional control of delinquency in African societies, its application in the contemporary administration of justice; criminal behaviors in Nigeria and its relation to personal and cultural conditions.

 

SOC 442.1      Demography

The nature and development of population study, its scope and method; some basic concepts of population analysis; international comparisons of population growth; problems of population in Africa; issues of population policy.

 

SOC 341.2 –    Political Sociology

An examination of social and cultural contexts of political activity and behavior; political organizations, trade unions, elite groups; the development of movement for political change.

SOC 412.2      Terrorism & Social Development:

This course examines the impact of terrorism on social development of Africa.  Other areas of emphases include: Theories of terrorism, global war on terrorism and efforts by some developing countries to fight terrorism.

 

SOC 444.1      Sociology of Development

Theories of development, socio-economic analysis of the concept of development and its relation to growth; sociological implications of development, its effects on society and family structure; the impact of colonial policies and post-independence/international conditions.

 

SOC 445.1      Urbanization and Labour Migration

The phenomenon of urban growth in various parts of the world; various forms of labour migration; the theories and economics of labour migration; characteristics of Nigerian cities.

 

SOC 446.1 Sociology of Medicine

The course will focus on the application of sociological concepts and theories to the study of disease, health and healing practices. It will also study the institution/foundations of healthcare, the relationship between traditional healing systems and modern medical practices, sources and practices of non-medical therapy, spiritual healing, doctor-patient relationship, etc.

 

SOC 447.1      Child Development

Methods of child study; the idea of development in infancy and childhood are examined in detail.

 

SOC 448.1      Personality and Motivation

The course attempts to familiarize students with major issues in personality and motivation, including theory and practice of personality measurement; the structure of personality and relationship between personality and psychopathology.

SOC 449.1      Models in Sociological Analysis

The course is built around two complementary issues:

  1. What types of explanations are used in Sociology, and
  2. What types of data are used in constructing explanations in Sociology?

The aim is to provide the students with the ability to evaluate a sociologist’s approach to any empirical area from two viewpoints:

  1. the chosen model of explanation adequate and
  2. Is the purported explanation adequate in terms of the chosen model?

POST GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN SOCIOLOGY

 

The post-graduate diploma in Sociology was established in the year 2001/2002.  It was designed as a bridge between the BSc and MSc degrees for those whose BSc graduation grades in Sociology and related disciplines do not qualify for a direct admission into the MSc programme.  The present policy is that, every candidate wishing to enroll in the MSc programme, whose BSc Degree was not obtained from Sociology and or other Social Sciences disciplines should do a postgraduate diploma (Sociology) PGDS, regardless of their  CGPA at the Bachelors degree level.  The PGDS remedies deficiencies in undergraduate sociological knowledge.

 

Aims & Objectives of Programme:

The Post Graduate Diploma in Sociology is designed to:

  1. enhance knowledge of Sociology and training skill of Social Work practitioners for effective performance in public and private economy sectors of the economy.
  2. serve as a pre-condition for the eventual admission into the MSc Sociology programme.
  3. provide opportunity for non sociology students in related disciplines especially those that are working to update their academic profile.

 

Eligibility:

The following categories of candidates are eligible to apply for admission into the One-year PGD Programme.

  1.  Candidates who possess a minimum of a Third Class Degree in Sociology from any recognized university.
  2. Candidates who possess at least Second Class Lower Degrees in related disciplines.

 

Duration of Programme:

The Full-Time PGDS programme is designed to last for one academic session of two (2) semesters and not longer than four (4) semesters.   For a Part-Time programme, it is for a minimum of (4) semesters and maximum of six (6) semesters, commencing from the normal University of Port Harcourt Calendar year and ending at the end of the normal session.

Mode of Application:

  1.  Requests for application forms should be made to the School of Postgraduate Studies (CPS).  The requests must be accompanied by the stipulated fee made payable to the University of Port Harcourt with the candidate’s name, address and course applied for, written at the reverse side.

 

Courses and Credit Load:

To qualify for the award of the Post-graduate Diploma in Sociology a Candidate must;

 

Take and Pass

(A)   Five (5) core courses of three (3) credit units each:

SOC 701.1      Fundamentals of Sociology

SOC 702.1      History of Social Thought

SOC 703.1      Research Methods in Sociology

SOC 704.1      Computer Appreciation

SOC 705.1      Social Work Issues in Entrepreneurship

 

 

(B)Three (3) Required courses of three (3) credit units each:

SOC 701.2      Sociology of Development

SOC 702.2      Criminology, Police Science & Social Work

SOC 703.2      Nature and Challenges of Human Resources Management

 

(C)Seminar and Project (in any of these areas) of five (5) credit units

SOC 704.2      Sociology of development & Social Change

SOC 705.2      Criminology and Sociology of deviance

SOC 706.2      Human Resources Management

SOC 707.2      Demography & Population Studies

SOC 708.2      Industrial Relations

 

(D)  Write a Project Report (3 Credit Units) on any of the Specialized Areas of Sociology stated in (b) above.

 

The total credit load per student required for graduation is 30 credit units.

 

Good Standing:

In each semester, a student must have a Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) of not less  than 3.00.

 

Withdrawal:

A Candidate with less than 3.00 CGPA shall remain in the programme for First semester, but shall be withdrawn if he/she fails to attain 3.00 CGPA at the end of the second semester.

 

Attendance:

A student is required to attain a minimum of 75% in attendance out of the total period of formal instructions delivered for the course in order for him/her to be eligible for examination in that particular course.

 

Completion of PGDS Programme:

Candidates must complete a total of 30 credit hours to complete the PGDS programme.

 

Course Assessment:

Each course will assessed on the basis of:

  1.  30% continuous assessment

 

  1.  70% end of semester written examination.  Candidates are expected to obtain a  minimum grade of C (50%) in each course they registered and a seminar in  order to be qualified for the award of the Post-Graduate Diploma in Sociology.   Grades per performance shall be:

F (fail)=0-49

 

Diploma Classification

The PGD in Sociology will be awarded with Distinction, Credit and Merit and it will be based on the Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) earned at the end of the programme.  It shall be classified as:

Distinction               –           4.50-5.00

Upper Credit           –           4.00-4.49

Lower Credit           –           3.50-3.99

Merit                       –           3.00-3.49

Fail                          –           0.00-2.99

 

 

 

Course Descriptions:

 

SOC 701.1:    Fundamentals of Sociology

The study of the Social System and its relationship to other systems, particularly the political and economic systems.  Attempt to understand how social systems evolve, differentiate, cohere or disintegrate.  Introduction to basic concepts or Sociological analysis, such as roles, social structure, function, conflict, class consensus, power, value, authority and culture.

 

 

SOC 702.1  –  History of Social Thought:

An intensive review of the contributors to social thought and the rise and development of modern sociology.  Emphasis will be placed on the impact made by the classical scholars in sociology and contemporary African Theorists on the theories of the social system.

 

SOC 703.1      –           Research Methods in Sociology:

This course reviews the theoretical and methodological foundations of Social Science research.  Issues treated include the nature of science; problems of scientific explanations; methodological problems of social science; concept formation theories and paradigms; the existential determination of knowledge and social science research techniques and procedures.

 

SOC 704.1      –           Computer Appreciation:

Introduction to basic computer concepts. Hardware and software, programming languages and data capture techniques.  Computer networks use of operating systems Microsoft windows and windows applications.  Data processing and the internet system.

 

 

SOC 705.1 – Social Work Issues in Entrepreneurship:

Contemporary issues of entrepreneurship in social work will be discussed in the form of a colloquium.  Some of the issues to be debated will include legal and ethical principles, economic and political issues; the issues of training, education and provision of social services.

 

 

SOC 701.2 -Sociology of Development:

Major theoretical perspectives in development study and their relevance to understanding the development crisis of third world countries.

 

SOC 702.2 – Criminology, Police Science & Social Work:

Sociological perspectives relating to various facets of criminal justice systems; such as socio-cultural foundation of criminal law, law enforcement function, operation and functions of courts and social institutions. The nature and scope of social work and social welfare institutions and legislations.

 

 

SOC 703.2 – Nature & Challenges of Human Resource Management:

The Emphasis of this course is on the nature and challenges of human resources management.  It examines also the theories of management and the process through which human resources are acquired, developed and retired in work organization.

 

 

SOC 704.2  – Seminar in Sociology of Development & Social Change:

A review and consideration of major issues and problems in Sociology of Development and Social Change.  It involves debates, discussions and an intensive analysis of selected topics by the instructor.

 

SOC 705.2 -Seminar in Criminology & Sociology of Deviance:

A review and consideration of the major issues and problems in Criminology and Sociology of deviance.  It involves debates, discussions and an intensive analysis of selected topics by the instructor.

 

SOC 706.2 -Seminar in Human Resources Management:

A review and consideration of the major issues and problems in Human Resources Management.   It involves debates, discussions and an intensive analysis of selected topics by the instructor.

 

SOC 707.2-Seminar in Demography & Population Studies:

A review and consideration of the major issues and problems in Demography & Population Studies.  It involves debates, discussions and an intensive analysis of selected topics by the instructor.

 

SOC 708.2-Industrial Relations:

A review and consideration of the major issues and problems in Industrial Sociology in modern society.  It involves debates, discussions and an intensive analysis of selected topics by the instructor.

GRADUATE DEGREES IN SOCIOLOGY:

The Department shall offer the MSc and PhD Degrees in the following areas of specialization:

  1.  Industrial Relations &Human Resources Management (IRHRM)
  2.  Criminology and Police Science.
  3.  Sociology of Development

 

 

 

 

Admission Requirements:

Subject to the general regulations of the School of Postgraduate Studies (CPS), the following requirements govern admission into the higher degree programme.

 

AWARD OF DEGREE

A.        The M.Sc

To qualify for the award of the M.Sc degree, a candidate must.

  1. Complete 33 semester hours of taught courses including a seminar and score not less than C in any of the courses. It is required that candidates should take a course in their areas of specialization.

 

  1. Satisfactorily defend a Dissertation written in his/her area of specialization. The Dissertation shall be computed as six (6) Credit Units.

 

  1. Meet all financial obligations to the University as well as other requirements relating to residence, character as may be prescribed by Senate recommendation of the School of Postgraduate Studies. At present the residency requirement is 12 months, (i.e 2 semesters, with the long vacation inclusive) for full-time students, and 2 calendar years for part-time students.

 

  1. No candidate will be registered for the M.Sc Degree for more than three calendar years, if a full-time student or for more than five years, if a part-time student. In exceptional circumstances Senate may on the recommendation of the Graduate Studies Committee and approved by the School of Postgraduate Studies, waive this rule.

 

 

 

MASTER OF SCIENCE (MSc) IN SOCIOLOGY:

 

Candidates must take and pass five (5) Core Courses of 3 credit units each.

Soc. 801.1       -Advanced Sociological Theories

Soc. 802.2       -Advanced Sociological Research Methods

Soc. 805.1       -Statistical Methods in Sociology

CGS.803.1      -ICT & Research Methods

CGS.804.2      -Entrepreneurship & Management.

 

  1. Industrial Relations and Human Resources Management (IRHRM)

First Semester:                                                                                                         Credit Units                          

1. Soc. 801.1 -Advanced Sociological Theories        3

2. CGS.803.1 -ICT & Research Methods                  3

3. Soc. 805.1 -Statistical Methods in Sociology         3

4. Soc. 816.1   -Foundations of Industrial Relations  3

5.Soc. 818.1-Human Resources Management         3                      Total Credit Units:=             15

 

Second Semester:

  1. Soc. 802.2-Advanced Sociological Research Methods 3
  2. CGS. 804.2 -Entrepreneurship & Management           3
  3. Soc.  819.2 – Theories of Industrial Management       3
  4. Soc817.2 –  Seminar in Industrial Relations & Human

Resources Management 3

  1. Msc Dissertation                                                          5

GRAND TOTAL CREDIT UNITS=33

 

 

 

B)     Criminology & PoliceScience:

First Semester

1. Soc. 801.1 –              Advanced Sociological Theories            3

2. CGS 803.1 -ICT & Research Methods              3

3.Soc. 805.1     Statistical Methods in Sociology                         3

4.Soc. 822.1     Advanced Criminology   or                    3

Soc. 825.1    Legalistic Criminology

5.Soc. 823.1     Victimology and the Criminal Justice System

or

Soc. 824.1        Police and Policing the Society                          3

Total CreditsUnits:    =               15­­­­

 

Second Semester:

  1. Soc 802.2 -Advanced Sociological Research Methods    3
  2. CGS 804.2-Entrepreneurship & Management                   3
  3. Soc 822.2 -Juvenile Justice and the Administration of

Criminal Justice

  •               3

Soc 823.2    -Prisons and Juvenile Institutions

(Treatment of Offenders)

And/or                                                  

Soc 824.2-Sociology of Deviance                                  3

  1. Soc –      -MSc Dissertation                                  6                      Total Credit Units=                                     18

 

GRAND TOTAL CREDIT UNITS:  =  33

 

C.  Sociology of Development:

First Semester

  1. Soc. 801.1   -Advanced Sociological Theories                    3
  2. CGS  803.1 – ICT & Research Methods                               3
  3. Soc  833.1   – Sociology of Development & Social                                     Change                                                 3
  4. Soc  834.1  – Capitalism & Dev. Of the Third World             3
  5. Soc  835.1  –  Demographic Resource Management & Dev.            3

                                                             Total Credit Units=15

 

Second Semester:

  1. Soc 802.2 Advanced Sociological Research Methods     3
  2. CGS804.2      –   Entrepreneurship & Management            3
  3. Soc 835.2      –   African Agrarian Systems & Sustainable                         Rural Development                                3
  4. Soc 839.2      –   Seminar in Sociology of Development &

Social Change3

  1. Soc.              –   MSc Dissertation                                   6                                                          Total Credit Units:     18                 GRAND TOTAL CREDIT UNITS:  =  33

 

 

 

 

 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY (Ph.D) IN SOCIOLOGY

B.  PhD Programme:

Same as in the Masters Programme, the PhD candidates must in addition submit a proposed plan of research long with his/her application.

Method of Application

Same as in the Maters Programme, The Ph.D. candidates must in addition submit a proposed plan of research along with his/her application.

 

Five (5) Core Courses of 3 Credit Units each:

First Semester:

  1. Soc. 901.1 -Applied Sociological Theories
  2. Soc  902.2 -Applied Sociological Research Methods

 

PhD students who did not get their MSc (Sociology) Degree in the University of Port Harcourt, must sit and pass the afore-stated  5 Core Courses.  This may required they attend Classes with the MSc Students who registered for SOC 801.1, SOC 802.2, SOC 805.1, CGS 803.1 and CGS 804.2.

  1.  INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS & HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT (IRHRM)FIRST SEMESTER

SOC 901.1      Applied Sociological Theories             3

SOC 905.1      Applied Statistical Methods in Sociology        3

Soc 910.1        Sociology of Work & Industry                         3

SOC 937.1      Third World in World Economy                      3

Total Credit Units=12

 

 

Second Semester:

  1. Soc. 902.2     Applied Research Methods in Sociology   3
  2. Soc. 913.2     Society and State in Industrial System      3
  3. Soc. 916.2Seminar in Industrial Relations & Human

Resources Management3

 

4.   Soc. 924.2 Sociology of Deviance           3                                                          Total Credit Units:  =  12

 

 

B)     Criminology & PoliceScience:

First Semester

  1.   Soc. 901.1    Applied Sociological Theories                   3

2.    Soc. 905.1     Applied Statistical Methods in Sociology  3

3.    Soc. 926.1 Theories of Deviant Behaviour                     3

4.   Soc. 937.1 Third World in World Economy                     3

5.     Soc  910.1Sociology of Work & Industry                       3                                                                      Total Credit Units:  =

 

Second Semester:

  1.  Soc. 902.2  -Applied Research Methods in Sociology    3
  2.  Soc. 925.2-Seminar in Criminology & Police Science    3

3.   Soc.927.2  – Urbanization, Social Change & Criminality 3

4.   Soc 940       – Thesis                                                           6

 

Total Credit Units:    9

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Sociology of Development:

First Semester

1.   Soc. 901.1  Applied  Sociological Theories                      3

4.    Soc. 910.1Sociology of Work & Industry            3

Total Credit Units:                                        =         12

 

Second Semester:

1.   Soc. 902.2-Applied Research Methods in Sociology       3

2.   Soc.  932.2 -World Population & Change 3

3.   Soc.  934.2 – Seminar in Sociology of Development       3

4.   Soc.  924.2 – Sociology of Deviance

Total Credit Units:  =                                                12

 

 

RESEARCH PROJECT:                                                                                                                                             

 

The PhD Thesis carries 12 Credit Units.  Candidates must write a Thesis in their

Area of Specialization.

 

The PhD:

To qualify for the award of the PhD Degree, a candidate must;

Take and pass:

  1.   Five prescribed compulsory courses and two other courses in his/her major field (one of which must be a doctoral seminar).

 

  1. Take and pass elective courses to remedy any deficiencies in courses as may be determined by his/her supervisor.

 

  1. Take and pass the Comprehensive Examination in at most two sittings.

 

  1. Successfully complete and defend a Thesis on topic approved by the Graduate studies Committee.

 

  1. Satisfy financial obligations to the University as well as other requirements relating to residence and character as may be prescribed by Senate on the recommendation of the School of Postgraduate Studies.  At present, the residence requirement is six (6) semesters (3 academic sessions)for  full-time students and ten (10) (5 academic sessions) semesters for part-time students.  No candidate will be registered for the PhD Degree for more than five years if he or she is a full-time student or for more than seven year  if a part-time student.

 

Theses:

  1. Theses and dissertations shall be original work presented in accordance with regulations approved by Senate on the recommendations of the School of Postgraduate Studies.  The PhD dissertation will be accepted only if it is deemed to make contribution to knowledge and shows evidence of originality.

 

  1. Theses and shall be graded by at least two examiners, which must include the thesis supervisor, and one external examiner.  A minimum grade of C for the thesis and for its defense is required for a pass.

 

Course Assessment:

Each course will be assessed on the basis of 30% continuous assessment and 70% end of semester written examination.  All candidates are required to obtain a grade of C or better in each course and in the Thesis in order to be awarded the PhD Degree.

 

 

 

 

Course Description:

 

MSc:

 

SOC 801.1 -Advanced Sociological Theories:

This course offers a critical review of major themes and theories of classical sociology, coupled with an examination of selected contemporary schools of thought.

 

SOC 802.2 -Advanced Sociological Research Methods:

Logical foundations of the social science; Problems in scientific methodology:  Qualitative and quantitative methods.  Research processes, survey design, sampling and data analysis.

 

SOC 805.1-Statistical Methods in Sociology:

Statistical methods and reasoning in advanced statistical application of statistical methods.  Prior knowledge of statistics is required.

 

SOC 816.1 – Foundation of Industrial Relations:

This course handles the theories and practice of industrial relations in the development and under-developed nations.  It examines the relevant institutions of job regulation, including labour unions, management and the state in the processes of job regulations.  Cognizance is given to the dynamics of the relative strength of labour and management from the point of view of the factors influencing the national industrial relations systems, such as the economy, the political environment and character of the state.

 

SOC 818.1 – Human Resource Management (HRM):

Study of the basic principles, methods and practice in Human Resources Management.  Management techniques, human resource development and management.  The dynamics of interpersonal relationships including such factors asperception, motivation, belief systems and aptitudes.  Training and executive development:  decision-making policies and management of conflict.

 

SOC 819.2-Theories of Industrial management:

Emphasis is on theories and practice of industrial management.  Industrial Resource Management Relationship between labour and management in historical and contemporary contexts, including the principles used in industrial management are discussed.

 

SOC 910.1-Sociology of Work & Industry:

The nature of work and industry.  Working conditions and their relationship to productivity behavior and control on workers.  Individual, group and industrial conflict.  Arbitrations and other means of dispute settlements.

 

SOC 817.2 -Seminar in Industrial Relations & Human \Resources Management:

Contemporary issues and problems in Industrial Relations & Human Resources will be discussed and debated upon.  The instructor will lead the discussions and encourage students to participate.

 

SOC 822.1- Advanced Criminology

Consideration of major theories; classical and contemporary theories of crime, delinquency, law and punishment.  Evaluation and analysis of current issues and problems in crime causation and treatment.  Emphasis will be placed on the explanation of contemporary problems associated with the control, detention and prevention of crime and delinquency in modern Nigeria.

 

SOC 823.1 -Victimology & the Criminal Justice  System

A critical evaluation of the current knowledge of the science of victimology with emphasis on the victims’ characteristics, problems encountered victims, including community attitude towards the victim, the interaction of the victim with the criminal justice system, and programmes for rehabilitation of the victim.  In addition, the course apprehension of criminals.  Various techniques used and styles of policing and providing police services will be studied.  The Legal Power of the police and problems associated with law enforcement are surveyed.  Throughout the course, attention will be paid to law and politics applied in policing the city and whether or not professionalism is maintained.

 

SOC 824.2/SOC 924.2  – Sociology of Deviance:

The emphasis of this course is to examine the forms of deviance: juvenile delinquency and adult crime.  The discussions will reveal the sociological approaches to deviance: functionalism, conflict theories, interactionist approach, feminist approach and post modern approach.

 

SOC 825.1 – Legalistic Criminology:

The application of criminomics in the analysis of criminal law and the determination of the cost implication of crimes.  Emphasis is placed on the criminomics of crimes against the person and property, and on public order crimes (e.g. transnational crime) and white-collar crimes.  Additionally, there will be a discussion on the of criminal justice system.

 

SOC 822.2 – Juvenile Justice & the administration of

                      CriminalJustice Systems:

The study focuses on the juvenile and criminal court process of adjudication and the impact these processes have on both the juvenile and the adult offender, especially when they are remanded in juvenile institutions and prisons or correctional facilities.

Emphasis will be placed on youth crime and delinquency and the various techniques for the treatment and rehabilitation of offender including the problems encountered in their application with special attention given to problems of resistance to treatment, issues of confidentiality and relationships with agency administration.

Milieu therapy, individual and group therapy, behavior therapy, therapeutic communities and the utilization of special rehabilitation agencies are studied.

 

SOC 824.1 -Police &  Policing the Society:

The course covers various aspects of policing a large urban area such as a metropolitan city.  Emphasis is on the roles and functions of the police in maintaining law and order, control, prevention and detection of crime, including the search and apprehension of criminals.  Various techniques used and styles of policing and providing police services will be studied.  The legal Powers of the police and problems associated with law enforcement are surveyed.  Throughout the course, attention will be paid to law and politics applied in policing the city and whether or not professionalism is maintained.

 

SOC 823.2 – Prisons & Juvenile Institutions (Treatment of Offenders)

The nature of prisons and juvenile institutions in Nigeria.  The various techniques for the treatment and rehabilitation of offenders.  Problems encountered in their application with special attention given to problems of resistance to treatment issues of confidentiality and relationships with agency administration.  Pragmatic justification and determination of the effectiveness of alternative penalties.

 

SOC 833.1-Sociology of Development & Social Change:

Sociological theories of development and underdevelopment with emphasis on contemporary schools of thought.  Included will be the neo-Marxist analysis of imperialism liberal-capitalist models, world system and dependency theories and relevant recent details.  The study will also discuss social change and development of various social change theories, globalization, agrarian reforms, community development and urbanization.

 

SOC 834.1 – Capitalism &  Development in the Third World:

An analysis of capitalist development and the incorporation of third world under-developing countries of Africa, Asia and Latin America.

 

SOC 835.2      -African Agrarian System & Sustainable Rural development:

Issues:  The structure of pre-industrial African societies; changes in the social structure of rural societies due t o incorporation into the world capitalist system; the nature of the new social formations in the area of capitalist penetration.  The

issues of development; theories and methods of rural development; critical study of rural development in Nigerian and other African countries will be addressed.

 

SOC 835.1 -Demographic Resource Management & Development:

Emphasis is on the relationship between population, resource management and economic development, population change and effects on national resources development are examined.  The relationship between population issues (fertility, mortality, migration, density and structure and development are studied.  Policies on resource management based on population change will be discussed.

 

SOC 839.2 -Seminar in Sociology of Development & Social Change:

A review and consideration of the major issues and problems in sociology of development and Social Change.  It involves debates, discussions and an intensive analysis of selected topics by instructor(s).

 

SOC 840  Dissertation

This shall be original work presented in accordance with the regulation approved by the Senate on the recommendation of the School of Graduate Studies. The student must first of all satisfy all the requirements at the Department Faculty and Graduate School levels before it can be sent to the External Examiner. It will be accepted only if is deemed to make contribution to knowledge and show evidence of originality. A minimum grade of C is required for a pass

 

PhD Course Descriptions:

SOC 910.1 – Sociology of Work & Industry:

The nature of work and industry.  Working conditions and their relationship to productivity behavior and control on workers.  Individual, group and industrial conflict.  Arbitrations and other means of dispute settlements.

 

SOC 913.2 – Society and State in Industrial Systems:

Analysis of class and power in industrial societies.  The ruling class, the proletariat, pressure groups and class struggle in Western Europe and North America.  Socialist systems and their contradictions.

 

SOC 916.2 –  Seminar in Industrial Relations & Human Resource Management:

A review of contemporary issues and problems in Human Resources Management.  Discussions and debates will be organized in the form of a colloquium.

 

SOC 926.1-Theories of Deviant Behaviour:

The review of theories of deviant behavior (e.g. Functionalism, Social disorganization and culture, Anomie, Differential association, Reference Groups, Neutralization and Drift).  Also, the study will focus on the politics of deviance and the impact of class on deviance.

 

 

 

 

SOC 927.2 – Urbanization, Social Change & Criminality:

The Study of the fundamental features and relationship between the phenomena of urbanization, social change criminality.  Theories, themes and processes of

urbanization and social change and how these affect/influence criminal behavior will be discussed.  It will involves an institutional analysis of the problem arising from these phenomena.

 

SOC 925.2 – Seminar in Criminology & Police Science:

A review of issues and problems in Criminology and Sociology of Deviance.  Discussions and debates will be organized in the form of a colloquium.

 

SOC 932.2 – World Population & Change:

The emphasis of this course is on world population, urbanization and the environment.  Theories of population growth globally and checking world population growth and the concept of New Suburbanites.  Modernization and the global theories of social change.

 

SOC 934.2 -Seminar in Sociology of Development & Social Change:

A review of issues and problems in Sociology of development and Population Studies.  Discussion and debates will be organized in the form of a colloquium.

 

SOC. 940. Thesis

This shall be original work presented in accordance with the regulation approved by the Senate on the recommendation of the School of Graduate Studies. The student must first of all satisfy all the requirements at the Department and Faculty and Graduate School levels before it can be sent to the External Examiner. It will be accepted only if is deemed to make contribution to knowledge and show evidence of originality. A minimum grade of C is required for a pass.

SCHOOL OF POSTGRADUATE STUDIES

ACADEMIC STAFF COMPOSITION

 
Prof. Iwarimie-Jaja, D. BSc, (Tenn), MSc John Jay, PhD – Uniport
Prof. Anele, K.A. BSc,  MSc, PhD – Uniport
Prof. Ifeanacho, M. BSc, (combined Honours) MA, Cork,  PhD – Uniport
Prof. Eke, Paul BSc,  MSc, PhD – Uniport
Prof. Okodudu, S.A. BSc,  MSc, PhD – Uniport
Prof. Okereke, C.I. BSc, IMSU,   MSc,Unilag, MBA – ABSU,  PhD – Ibadan.
Dr. Ekpenyong, O BSc,  Uyo, MSc, PhD – Uniport Senior Lecturer
Dr. Abu, O.P. BSc,  MSc, PhD – Uniport Senior Lecturer
Dr. Joseph-Obi   Chioma B.ED, MPP, MA, UI. Ph.D Uniport Senior Lecturer
Dr. Okemini, E.B. BSc, MSc,PhD – Uniport Senior Lecturer
Dr. Nsirim-Worlu, H.G. BSc,  MSc, PhD – Uniport Senior Lecturer
Dr. Onyige, C.D. BSc,  MSc, PhD – Uniport Senior Lecturer
Dr. Sofiri-Joab, Peterside, BSc,  MSc, PhD – Uniport Senior Lecturer
Dr Steven Wordu BSc,  MSc, PhD – Uniport Senior Lecturer
Dr. Wosu, Eze BSc,  MSc, PhD – Uniport Senior Lecturer
Dr. Badey, D.K. BSc,  MSc, PhD – Uniport Senior Lecturer
Dr. Daniel Uranta B.Ed, M.Sc, Ph.D.  Uniport Senior Lecturer
Dr. C. I. Erondu BSc UNN, MSc, PhD – Uniport Senior Lecturer
Dr. Adaku Ubelejit-Nte BSc UNN, MSc, PhD – Uniport Lecturer 1
Dr. C. Oriji B.Ed, M.Sc, Ph.D.  Unical Lecturer 1
Dr. M. Ogbanga BSc,  MSc, PhD – Uniport Lecturer 1
Dr. Kinikanwo Samuel BSc,  MSc, PhD – Uniport Lecturer 1